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Portfolio: This is Hoveringham June 2002

"This is Hoveringham June 2002" is a visual documentation of a village in Nottingham called Hoveringham. "This Hoveringham June 2002" CDROM features a fun interactive map of Hoveringham, allowing access to over 2000 full-colour photos. This includes a photo of every house in Hoveringham, the surrounding countryside, the river Trent, and many exciting events in Hoveringham during June 2002.

This is Hoveringham June 2002 menu page

This is Hoveringham June 2002 CDROM £9.99

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Hoveringham

Hoveringham is a pretty rural village, near the River Trent, half way between Newark and Nottingham and 5 miles south west of Southwell. Its parish comprises 850 acres of land with approximately 130 houses.

Hoveringham in the White's directory

According to White’s Directory of 1853 in the reign of Henry III it was possessed by Hugh de Hoveringham, and afterwards passed to the Goushill family. The Goushill’s gave a great part of the estate to Thurgarton Priory, from which it passed to Trinity College Cambridge in lieu of tithes. The parish was tithe free for upwards of 70 years until 1851, when four shillings per acre was laid on as tithe. In 1795, many old writings and documents which were deposited in the church were destroyed by the great flood. It is supposed that the writings belonging to the land which was set apart in lieu of the tithes were amongst them. Sir Richard Sutton, Bart was the lessee of the manorial rights, and of 647 acres of college land, which was held by the Cooper family, from the time of the Reformation till 1830. There were about 20 freeholders in the parish.

Churches of Hoveringham

The church of St Michael is a small, ancient structure, and is in the patronage of the same college. It is a perpetual curacy, which was valued at £60, and is annexed to that of Thurgarton. The two livings had recently been augmented to the value of £450 by Trinity College, Cambridge. The church contains some ancient monuments of the Goushill family. One to Thomas Goushill is dated 1393, and near to it is a tomb of Sir Robert Goushill, and the Duchess of Norfolk, his lady, upon which are their statues. The tomb has been beautifully ornamented with the arms of the Leeks, Babingtons, and others. They have recently been removed to the south west end of the church. In a field at the back of the church is a spa, formerly celebrated for its medicinal virtues, it was filled up about 25 years ago. There is a small chapel erected by the Wesleyans, which is now a private dwelling, along with the neat National School erected in 1851.

Hoveringham statistics

Hoveringham village today is according to the Acorn profile on www.upmystreet.com is a type 2 village with wealthy commuters. The age profile of this kind of village is fairly flat with 20% more than average 45-64 year olds and 20% less than average 0-4 year olds. The ethnic profile is 99% white. There are many detached large houses in the village and most people own at least one car. However, this masks the rural poverty, which these villages can suffer from, and Hoveringham is no exception. There is no local shop any more, when there was at one time many and no village school. Bus services are few and far between and young people who wish to remain in the village have to seek work outside and live with their parents most of the time, as there is little low cost housing. Farming has also declined as farmers have been forced to diversify to survive and many of the traditional occupations have also disappeared. Hoveringham used to have a butchers shop and a bakers and a Post Office.

Pubs of Hoveringham

However, two out of the village pubs remain. The Reindeer Inn on Main St and The Marquis of Granby almost opposite. The Elm Tree down on the banks of the Trent has now closed and is private accommodation, but many people in the village still remember the local dances, which were once held there.

The village today is a lively and vibrant comprising of the Main Street, Brookfield Drive (know locally as Holy Row), Homeleigh Lane, Post Office Yard, Gonalston Lane, Bradley’s Lane, Lansic Lane, Boat Lane, Lodgefield Lane and Thurgarton Rd. We have 2 pubs, a Mill, Ferry Farm Park, a sailing lake, a quarry and many clubs and activities.

This is Hoveringham June 2002

This CDROM documents the month of June 2002 in Hoveringham village with over 2000 photographs in and around the village. There are also photos of George the Travelling Man who came to stay with us, sharpening knives and making lovely willow flowers and pegs and Jean’s birthday at the Marquis of Granby. World cup day morning was recorded at the Reindeer Inn and a day at Ferry Farm Park with all the animals, rare breeds, rabbits, goats and adventure playground. To complete this lovely record is a walk along the river bank, the church and flower festival, local gardens which were open for a day and attracted many visitors and Morris dancers, the annual vintage car and tractor rally, an art and craft show, Manor Farm sale, and a spectacular sunset over the Reindeer Inn. Every page has local history and contributions are still welcome to complete this lovely piece of local history.

This is Hoveringham June 2002 CDROM £9.99

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